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Joe Yonan

Journalist, cookbook author

Washington, DC

Joe Yonan

Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post
Weeknight Vegetarian columnist
Author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook"

Featured

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Plate Lab: Izakaya Seki’s garlic fried rice is a bowl of late-night comfort

fried rice with garlic chips — looks plain and even unassuming, but all it takes is one taste to realize that this is pure comfort food, a perfect balance of flavors and textures in each bite. At the stove behind the bar, Hiroshi Seki , chef-owner of the restaurant on V Street NW , makes the technique look simple.
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Free Range on Food

Joe Yonan is the Food editor of The Post and the author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook." He writes the Food section's Weeknight Vegetarian column. Bonnie S. Benwick has the job most envied among cocktail-party conversations. If they only knew. ... Cook with her each week at Dinner in Minutes.
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For the front-yard gardener, are cover crops worth the trouble?

One day, I fantasize, I’ll be standing at the top of a hill, saying to an heir, “As far as the eye can see, all this is now yours.”. In the reality of now, the only way my property encompasses all that the eye can see is if I take off my glasses, or perhaps look down and squint. When I do, I see my urban garden as a farm in miniature: Acres upon acres translate into square foot upon square foot, rolling fields equal a little front yard, and the only hill I have to stand on is at the top of the stairs leading down to the sidewalk.
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A tart made just for garlic lovers

Last year, at a book party in Charleston, S.C., I heard a sad question. A woman pulled me aside to ask whether any of my dishes on the buffet table included garlic, onions, scallions or leeks. It was sad because, unlike me, she hates those ingredients — or, more accurately, they don’t like her so much.
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Free Range on Food

Joe Yonan is the Food editor of The Post and the author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook." He writes the Food section's Weeknight Vegetarian column. Bonnie S. Benwick has the job most envied among cocktail-party conversations. If they only knew. ... Cook with her each week at Dinner in Minutes.
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Weeknight Vegetarian: A dose of soup from a vegetable-loving German chef

If you had asked me this time last year whether I considered German to be a particularly vegetarian-friendly cuisine, I would have laughed. My opinion wouldn’t have been based on any actual travel to Germany, only on some limited experiences in German restaurants (including mounds of smoked sausages ingested in central Texas).
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Plate Lab: Making empanadas rich and juicy enough to satisfy an Argentine

Jose wants his empanadas to be juicy,” says chef Louis Goral. “Super-juicy.”. Joe Yonan is the Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post and the author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook." He writes the Food section's Weeknight Vegetarian column. View Archive. Goral is referring to Jose Garces, the Philadelphia-based chef and empire builder who opened the Argentine-themed Rural Society in the District this past summer.
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Q&A with Marcus Samuelsson: Cooking’s ‘value proposition’

The famous chef, author and TV personality makes the dessert he served at President Obama's 2009 state dinner in honor of the Indian prime minister. (Jason Aldag & Jayne W. Orenstein/The Washington Post) He hasn’t stopped at restaurants, taking his star quality to such shows as “Top Chef Masters” (which he won) and “Chopped” (which he judges), telling his life story in “Yes, Chef” and demystifying the recipes of Scandinavia, Africa and America in cookbooks.
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Thanksgiving FAQs: How do I make the best mashed potatoes?

From now until Thanksgiving, we’ll be answering some of the most commonly asked holiday meal questions. Have one you’d like us to consider? E-mail us or join our weekly live Web chat on Wednesdays from noon to 1 p.m. For complete Turkey Day coverage, visit our Thanksgiving Central page. For some of us, the best thing about Thanksgiving dinner isn't the turkey, or the stuffing, or even the pie.
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Free Range on Food: Thanksgiving

We answer reader questions about Thanksgiving cooking, with special guest Tarver King of Patowmack Farm.
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Urban gardening: Floating row covers protect winter plants

Frankly, they look a little like Halloween decorations: billowy, semi-sheer white fabric pieces draped over two of my urban front-yard garden’s raised beds. Ghostly, or perhaps spider-webby. What I’m hoping they’ll do is anything but scary. These floating row covers can protect plants from wind and dropping temperatures as we stream through fall and into winter, and I’m counting on them to extend my garden.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Vegetarian dishes worth Thanksgiving centerpiece status

Last year around this time, I was crowing about the fact that without a turkey to worry about, Thanksgiving planning and cooking get a whole lot less complicated. But now that I’m working on my third vegetarian version of the holiday dinner, I’m realizing that I start with the same decision every year: what to cook that will look impressive enough to take its place at the center of the table.
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About

Joe Yonan

Joe Yonan is the two-time James Beard Award-winning Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post and author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook” (Ten Speed Press, 2013), which was named among the best cookbooks of 2013 by The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, and NPR's "Here and Now.” In 2011, he wrote “Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One,”. which Serious Eats, David Lebovitz, and the San Francisco Chronicle named to their best-of-the-year lists.

Joe was a food writer and Travel section editor at The Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit the Post’s Food section. He writes the Post’s Weeknight Vegetarian column and for five years wrote the Cooking for One column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists. He also writes regularly about his efforts to grow food on his 150-square-foot urban front yard. His work from the Globe and Post has appeared in four editions of the “Best Food Writing” anthology.

In addition to his writing and editing, Joe frequently speaks about his work at conferences, book festivals and other events, and has taught many cooking classes through such venues as Central Market, Stonewall Kitchen, Culinaerie, L’Academie de Cuisine and SideTour.

Joe, who grew up in West Texas, spent 2012 in North Berwick, Maine, on leave from the Post to learn about growing and homesteading from his sister and brother-in-law and to work on “Eat Your Vegetables.” He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and the Cambridge (Mass.) School of Culinary Arts.