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Joe Yonan

Journalist, cookbook author

Washington, DC

Joe Yonan

Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post
Weeknight Vegetarian columnist
Editor, "America The Great Cookbook"
Author, "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook"

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Free Range on Food

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Free Range on Food: Rodney Scott's whole hog barbecue, snail farming, doctoring store-bought croissants, this week's recipes and more.

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This chickpea curry is what your roasted tomatoes have been waiting for

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Free Range on Food: Breaking your plastic habit, how to drink tequila, this week's recipes and more.

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When summer corn is at its sweetest, this Thai salad adds a little heat

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A tasty summer salad that’s throw-together simple

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This spicy eggplant dish is a riot of textures and flavors

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This spicy eggplant dish is a riot of textures and flavors

Tracye McQuirter obviously gets it. In her inspiring new cookbook, “Ageless Vegan” (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2018), she scatters pine nuts on collard greens; sprinkles nutritional yeast, cashews and cayenne on stuffed mushrooms; and stirs slices of raw celery into grains right before serving. The book, written with her 80-year-old mother, Mary, is a guide to the health-giving qualities of a well-balanced vegan diet, and it’s full of smart tips and strategies.
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Here’s how to make your avocado even more craveable: Grill it.

Who says you can’t cook an avocado? We’re so accustomed to using it raw, for that silky texture it brings to sandwiches, salads, grain bowls, tacos, smoothies, ice creams, gazpachos and more, but rarely do you see dishes that involve heating it. Avocados take particularly well to grilling, indoors or out.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Here’s how to make your avocado even more craveable: Grill it.

Who says you can’t cook an avocado? We’re so accustomed to using it raw, for that silky texture it brings to sandwiches, salads, grain bowls, tacos, smoothies, ice creams, gazpachos and more, but rarely do you see dishes that involve heating it. Avocados take particularly well to grilling, indoors or out.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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The most unexpected (and welcome) guest at your next cookout: Carrot dogs

This plant-based take on hot dogs gives carrots a roasted red pepper treatment: Char (either on the grill or under the broiler) and steam them, and then peel off the skins. They end up nicely cooked and lightly smoke-tinged, making them perfect for a cookout. Choose the largest, thickest carrots you can find; they shrink during cooking, and you can always trim the narrow end to fit the bun.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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The most unexpected (and welcome) guest at your next cookout: Carrot dogs

This plant-based take on hot dogs gives carrots a roasted red pepper treatment: Char (either on the grill or under the broiler) and steam them, and then peel off the skins. They end up nicely cooked and lightly smoke-tinged, making them perfect for a cookout. Choose the largest, thickest carrots you can find; they shrink during cooking, and you can always trim the narrow end to fit the bun.
The Washington Post Link to Story

About

Joe Yonan

Joe Yonan is the two-time James Beard Award-winning Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post and editor of "America The Great Cookbook" (Weldon Owen, 2017), a work to benefit No Kid Hungry that was named among the best cookbooks of 2017 by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and the San Francisco Chronicle. He is also author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook” (Ten Speed Press, 2013), which was named among the best cookbooks of 2013 by The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, and NPR's "Here and Now.” In 2011, he wrote “Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One,”. which Serious Eats, David Lebovitz, and the San Francisco Chronicle named to their best-of-the-year lists.

Joe was a food writer and Travel section editor at The Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit the Post’s Food section. He writes the Post’s Weeknight Vegetarian column and for five years wrote the Cooking for One column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists. He also writes regularly about his efforts to grow food on his 150-square-foot urban front yard. His work from the Globe and Post has appeared in multiple editions of the “Best Food Writing” anthology.

In addition to his writing and editing, Joe frequently speaks about his work at conferences, book festivals and other events, and has taught many cooking classes through such venues as Central Market, Stonewall Kitchen, Culinaerie, L’Academie de Cuisine and SideTour.

Joe, who grew up in West Texas, spent 2012 in North Berwick, Maine, on leave from the Post to learn about growing and homesteading from his sister and brother-in-law and to work on “Eat Your Vegetables.” He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and the Cambridge (Mass.) School of Culinary Arts.