Open-uri20140927-2-375no5_thumb

Joe Yonan

Journalist, cookbook author

Washington, DC

Joe Yonan

Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post
Weeknight Vegetarian columnist
Editor, "America The Great Cookbook"
Author, "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook"

Story_default_image_grey

This simple Portuguese soup will perk up your cold-weather doldrums

For decades, vegetarians have looked to global cuisines for inspiration. The pioneer was Anna Thomas, author of “The Vegetarian Epicure,” a 1972 bestseller. As Jonathan Kauffman writes in his captivating new book, “Hippie Food,” at a time when much vegetarian food was brown-on-brown, Thomas “pored over Italian and Middle Eastern cookbooks, in which vegetables were integrated in ways meat-and-potato Americans never imagined.”.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20180110-4-1hdv5zz_profile

Free Range on Food

Open-uri20180103-4-umws8w_profile

Free Range on Food

Story_default_image_grey

For a bowl of winter comfort, lentils are the easy answer

I take lentils for granted. I’ve had bursts of creativity using them, but for the most part they sit in my pantry while I reach for bigger, more tempting members of the legume family week in and week out. Until one day, I’m out of cans of chickpeas, don’t have any cooked beans in the fridge or freezer, and don’t feel like taking out the pressure cooker to bang out a new batch.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20171227-4-2l5idl_profile

Free Range on Food

Story_default_image_grey

The secrets to cauliflower-crust pizza that you’ll want to devour

When it comes to trendy foods, I’m no early adopter. It took me years to get past my quibbles with quinoa, to dive into the mysteries of chia pudding and, most recently, to tackle a cauliflower pizza crust. As with the first two items on that list, the cauliflower pizza I tried a couple of years ago was so disappointing (soggy), I dismissed the entire concept as not worth the time.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20171220-4-yh0fd1_profile

Free Range on Food

Story_default_image_grey

This cheesy potato casserole can take you home

This time of year, I get homesick for a home that doesn’t exist anymore. My mom is in a nursing home in Maine, far from the rambling West Texas house where I grew up (and which we sold last year), and the closest thing I have to her cooking is an old spiral-bound cookbook and the recipe cards stuffed into it.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20171213-4-1riyfy_profile

Free Range on Food

Open-uri20171206-4-1gql5me_profile

Free Range on Food

Story_default_image_grey

The cozy-season path to easy tomato soup starts with roasting

There’s a cruel irony when it comes to tomato soup: I want to use fresh tomatoes in it, but by the time sweater weather comes around and has me in a soup frame of mind, good local tomatoes are a thing of the past. That has previously left me with just two choices: Wait until next year, or use canned tomatoes.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20171130-4-7ocx2z_profile

A crunchy, cheesy seasonal salad that is anything but garden variety

In spring and summer, salads can be easily thrown together with a few — or many — fresh, seasonal raw ingredients. In fall and winter, they take a little more thought, because usually at least some of those elements need to be cooked. But the same principles of salad making apply, especially the primary one: Think about texture.
The Washington Post Link to Story

About

Joe Yonan

Joe Yonan is the two-time James Beard Award-winning Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post and editor of "America The Great Cookbook" (Weldon Owen, 2017), a work to benefit No Kid Hungry that was named among the best cookbooks of 2017 by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and the San Francisco Chronicle. He is also author of "Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook” (Ten Speed Press, 2013), which was named among the best cookbooks of 2013 by The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, and NPR's "Here and Now.” In 2011, he wrote “Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One,”. which Serious Eats, David Lebovitz, and the San Francisco Chronicle named to their best-of-the-year lists.

Joe was a food writer and Travel section editor at The Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit the Post’s Food section. He writes the Post’s Weeknight Vegetarian column and for five years wrote the Cooking for One column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists. He also writes regularly about his efforts to grow food on his 150-square-foot urban front yard. His work from the Globe and Post has appeared in multiple editions of the “Best Food Writing” anthology.

In addition to his writing and editing, Joe frequently speaks about his work at conferences, book festivals and other events, and has taught many cooking classes through such venues as Central Market, Stonewall Kitchen, Culinaerie, L’Academie de Cuisine and SideTour.

Joe, who grew up in West Texas, spent 2012 in North Berwick, Maine, on leave from the Post to learn about growing and homesteading from his sister and brother-in-law and to work on “Eat Your Vegetables.” He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and the Cambridge (Mass.) School of Culinary Arts.